Skip To Content

Search

Syllabus

LACKAWANNA COLLEGE

PSY 105 - Intro to Psychology

Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-2:30

                                           

Instructor

Jacquelin Kuwik

Phone

 

 

 

E-mail

Jacquelin.Kuwik@falcons.lackawanna.edu

Office Hours

By apt only

 

 

 

Text

Psychology in Everyday Life Edition: 4th

Author: Myers Edition: 4th ISBN: 9781319013738 Publisher: Worth Publishing Company

 

Description

Introduction to Psychology This is a survey of the major areas of psychology, including human growth and development, social behavior, cognition, learning, personality theory, personal adjustment, abnormal behavior and psychological measurement (3 Credits).

Objectives

  1. To demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  2. To compare and contrast the major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural).
  3. To develop an enhanced ability to use critical thinking skills to examine issues related to human behavior and mental processes.
  4. To articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues.
  5. To examine the sociocultural differences that influence individual differences in behavior

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance Policy:

Students enrolled in credit-bearing courses at Lackawanna College will fail any course(s) in which they accumulate absences beyond the maximum number allowed. This pertains to online classes as well. Attendance is tracked by instructors, so be sure to log on and adhere to the following scale:

                    

# of Times Class Meets

Maximum # of Absences Allowed

3 times a week

6

2 times a week 4

4

1 time a week 2

2

Developmental Classes

DE 010, DE 020, DE 030

3

 

Withdrawal Policy

A student has the privilege of withdrawing from any courses or from the College itself without academic penalty up to and including the final date for withdrawal indicated on the College calendar.

To withdraw officially from a course or from the College, a student must obtain the proper withdrawal form from the Student Affairs Office or from your Center Director, complete this form and submit it to the Registrar's Office before the final day for withdrawal without academic penalty as indicated on the College calendar. If a student stops attending a course for which he/she is registered after the published census date (end of drop/add) without having officially withdrawn from the course, the student will be assigned an AW (penalty-grade failure) for the class. No exceptions will be made.

Students who violate the College's Academic Integrity Policy and fail a course in consequence may not exercise the withdrawal privilege in that particular course.

 

Financial obligations to the College will be determined according to the Refund Policy.

 

Instructor Policies

  • My classroom is full of respect and free from judgment. I expect the same from all of my students.
  • Attendance and punctuality is expected. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of class by your instructor.
  • Absences and tardiness will affect your class participation, which is part of your final grade. Every student is expected to participate in class discussions, be prepared, and be ON TIME.
  • You should have access to the current [online] materials in order to be prepared for class discussions and to complete various exercises throughout the course.
  • TURN OFF ALL CELL PHONES AND ELECTRONIC DEVICES. Unauthorized use in class will result in an attendance record of “absent” for that class. Multiple violations may result in lost privileges on various assignments.
  • After reviewing the critical components of the syllabus..Grading
  •  

Assignment Title

Points Value

What Should I Do?

Points Available

Did I do This?

Where?

Points Earned

In this column, you will find each of the assignment’s requirements.

In this column you will find out how much each requirement is worth.

You should fill in this column. Doing so helps you to monitor your own progress and double check that you have met each requirement successfully.

You should fill in this column too. By identifying exactly where you believe you have met each requirement, you give your instructor clarity about your efforts. Without identifying the slide, page, paragraph, etc. where you have met the requirement, your instructor may believe you have skipped it. Completing this column increases the likelihood of receiving at least partial credit.

Your instructor will fill in this column. It will tell you the score you have earned.

 

Requirements

Journal Reflections (20 points)

You are to respond to both of the weekly Journal Reflection Questions demonstrating a clear understanding of the weekly topic of question. There will be a topic of question for two of the weeks related to your weekly course topics. You are to record your responses or reflections to the weekly topic of question. In other words, it should be a record of your inner life and self-reflections on your experiences and relationships to the weekly topic of question. You are to include your perceptions and feelings expressed in a way that demonstrates your self-understanding and personal growth. You will need to upload your journal reflection response under Assignments on the designated weekly Journal Reflection on your course page. You will also need to complete and upload the evaluation rubrics for each Journal Reflection entry. The Journal Reflection Rubric can be found under Handouts and Links. Be certain to complete each column of the rubric. Be specific as to where you think you met the requirement.

Journal Reflection Topics and Questions

Week 4- There are four major research perspectives in psychology: the biological perspective, the cognitive perspective, the behavioral perspective, and the sociocultural perspective. Explain how researchers working from each of psychology's major perspectives might investigate an emotion such as love?

Week 5&6- Positive psychology is a social and intellectual movement within the discipline of psychology that focuses on human strengths and how people can flourish and be successful. Visit the positive psychology news website at http://positivepsychologynews.com/ . Summarize and critique a news article from the website. Discuss the psychological benefits positive psychology can have for oneself.

Journal Reflection Rubric

10 Points

What Should I Do?

Did I do this?

Points Available

Where?

Points Earned

What Page & Paragraph

Clear demonstration of understanding of the topic of question.

 

3

 

 

Self-reflection on your experiences and relationships to the topic of question.

 

3

 

 

Perceptions and feelings expressed in a way that demonstrates your self-understanding and personal growth.

 

3

 

 

Writing and grammar style. Organization and clarity of reflection.

 

1

 

 

Heinz steals the drug

In Europe, a woman was near death from a special kind of cancer. There was one drug that the doctors thought might save her. It was a form of radium that a druggist in the same town had recently discovered. The drug was expensive to make, but the druggist was charging ten times what the drug cost him to make. He paid $200 for the radium and charged $2,000 for a small dose of the drug. The sick woman's husband, Heinz, went to everyone he knew to borrow the money, but he could only get together about $ 1,000 which is half of what it cost. He told the druggist that his wife was dying and asked him to sell it cheaper or let him pay later. But the druggist said: "No, I discovered the drug and I'm going to make money from it." So Heinz got desperate and broke into the man's store to steal the drug-for his wife. (Kohlberg, 1963, p. 19)

 Should Heinz break into the laboratory to steal the drug for his wife? Why or why not?                                                                                  

Give examples of possible arguments that belong Kohlberg's six stages. What would Heinz do based on each of the six stages?

    Stage one (obedience):

    Stage two (self-interest):

    Stage three (conformity):

    Stage four (law-and-order):

    Stage five (human rights):

    Stage six (universal human ethics):

 Heinz Case Study Rubric

20 Points

What Should I Do?

Did I do this?

Points Available

Where?

Points Earned

 

 

What Page & Paragraph?

 

 

Discuss whether Heinz should break into the laboratory to steal the drug for his wife.

 

5

 

 

 

 

Provide examples of possible arguments that belong to Kohlberg’s six stages.

 

5

 

 

 

 

Discuss what would Heinz do based on each of the six stages.

 

5

 

 

 

 

Writing and grammar style. Organization and clarity of reflection.

 

5

 

                                      

 

 

               

 

Stanford Prison Experiment Role Play Assignment (20 points)                  

Social psychology is the scientific study of how people influence one another’s behavior and thinking. Attribution is the process by which we explain our own behavior and the behavior of others—how we answer the question, “What are the causes of personal behavior and the behavior of others?”

“What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

“The study of prison life began with an average group of healthy, intelligent, middle-class males. These boys were arbitrarily divided into two groups by a flip of the coin. Half were randomly assigned to be guards, the other to be prisoners. It is important to remember that at the beginning of our experiment there were no differences between boys assigned to be a prisoner and boys assigned to be a guard.”  http://www.prisonexp.org/.

Watch the video Stanford Prison Experiment at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbc.

Answer the discussion questions below putting yourself in the roles of the guard, the prisoner and the experimenter. Upload your assignment with completed rubric under Assignments on the course portal page.

  1. Guard: If you were a guard, what type of guard would you have become? How sure are you? If you were a "good guard" what would prevent you from objecting or countermanding the orders from tough or bad guards. After the study, how do you think you as the guard would feel when you saw the prisoner in the same civilian clothes again and saw their prison reconverted to a basement laboratory hallway?
  1. Prisoner: Describe what kind of prisoner you think you would be if assigned that role. If you were a prisoner, would you have been able to endure the prison experience? What would you have done differently? What would you have done differently than those subjects did? If you were imprisoned in a "real" prison for five years or more, could you take it?
  2. After the study, how do you think the prisoners felt when they saw the guards in the same civilian clothes again and saw their prison reconverted to a basement laboratory hallway?
  1. Experimenter: If you were the experimenter in charge, would you have done this study? Would you have terminated it earlier? Would you have conducted a follow-up study? Explain your rationale.
  1. How do you think, or even why, people conform to roles they are assigned? Explain.
  1. Explain how the actor-observer difference in attributions, the fundamental attribution error, and self-perception theory relate to the Stanford Prison Experiment.
  2.  

Stanford Prison Experiment Role Play Assignment Rubric

20 Points

What Should I Do?

Did I do this?

Points Available

Where?

Points Earned

 

What Page & Paragraph?

 

Answer the discussion questions below putting yourself in the roles of the guard, the prisoner and the experimenter.

 

          5

 

 

 

Discuss role conformity expressed in a way that demonstrates your understanding.

 

          5

 

 

 

Explain how the actor-observer difference in attributions, the fundamental attribution error, and self-perception theory relate to the Stanford Prison Experiment.

 

          5

 

 

 

Writing and grammar style. Organization and clarity of reflection.

 

          5

 

 

 

             

 

 

Letter Grade

Numeric Range

Quality Points

A

96 – 100

4.0

A-

90 – 95

3.67

B+

87 – 89

3.33

B

83 – 86

3.0

B-

80 – 82

2.67

C+

77 – 79

2.33

C

73 – 76

2.0

C-

70 – 72

1.67

D+

67 – 69

1.33

D

60 – 66

1.0

F

0 – 59

0

 

Due Dates and Late Penalties

  • The grace period for late assignments is as follows:
    • 1 day late-10% deduction off of the assignment grade
    • 2 days late-20% off of the assignment grade
    • 3 days late-the assignment will receive a grade of 0%
  • There will be no “extra credit.”

 

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty in any form, such as plagiarism and cheating, will not be tolerated either in the online or traditional classrooms. Sanctions will include an automatic F for plagiarism, but the severity or frequency of the violation may result in dismissal from the College as well.

 

The following are among the forms of dishonesty, in a classroom of any type, for which sanctions may be applied:

  • Using books, notes or other materials during an examination, unless expressly permitted;
  • Using purchased essays, term papers or preparatory research for such papers;
  • Copying others' work or engaging in unauthorized cooperation during an assignment or examination;
  • Allowing another student to copy from an examination or other assignment intended to be performed independently;
  • Borrowing from published works, whether material is taken verbatim or with minor alterations, without proper and/or sufficient acknowledgment;
  • Submitting as one’s own work originally done by someone else;
  • Submitting the same written report in more than one course without prior approval from the instructor(s) involved;
  • Stealing examinations or assignments;
  • Supplying or selling examinations or assignments;
  • Misrepresenting statements concerning work submitted;
  • Falsifying or fabricating experimental data or results;
  • Falsifying or fabricating the need for extensions on papers or make-up examinations.
  • Misrepresenting identity in an online course

 

(Please see the student handbook for more information.)

 

Disability Statement

Lackawanna College is an Affirmative Action, Equal Employment Opportunity institution.  Students with disabilities and other needs should feel free to contact the instructor privately if there are services and adaptations which can be made to accommodate specific needs.  Students who are having difficulties with class material are strongly advised to seek assistance in the reading and writing lab.  If you feel that you have a disability that has not been formally documented, you may meet with Mrs. Christine Kiehart in the Disability Services office to discuss your options. Please note that disability services do not include exemption from participation requirements in courses considered part of the School of Distance Education, including online and hybrid courses.

Lackawanna College Notice of Nondiscrimination

 

Lackawanna College will not discriminate in its educational programs, activities, or employment practices, based on race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion, ancestry, union membership, or any other legally protected classification. Announcement of this policy is in accordance with State Law including the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act and with Federal Law including Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

 

Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities. Lackawanna College is committed to providing an educational and work environment that is free from unlawful sexual discrimination including sexual harassment, sexual violence, and gender based harassment.

 

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Lackawanna College will not tolerate any forms of sexual misconduct including but not limited to: sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual violence and gender-based harassment by employees, students or third parties. This includes prohibiting discrimination against pregnant and parenting students. The College also prohibits retaliation against any person who makes a claim of discrimination or harassment or who provides information in such an investigation. This policy applies to admissions, employment, treatment and access to all programs and activities that take place either on or off the campus at Lackawanna College.

 

Lackawanna College will fully and promptly investigate all allegations of sexual misconduct and will take action reasonably designed to resolve the complaint in an equitable manner, end a hostile environment if one has been created, prevent its recurrence, and, when appropriate, take steps to remedy its effects on individuals and the college community.

Lackawanna College complies with Title IX and all other federal laws and regulations that prohibit discrimination in education programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance.

Reports or inquiries regarding nondiscrimination should be made to:

Title IX Coordinator/ Executive Director of the Student Wellness Program, Marsha Pigga, Angeli Hall, Room 102, 501 Vine Street, Scranton PA, 18509 (570) 955-1466/ (570) 677-7589, piggam@lackawanna.edu

Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action inquiries: Carolyn Quinn, Affirmative Action Officer/Director of Continuing Education, Angeli Hall, Room 300C, Vine Street, Scranton PA (570) 961-7815, QuinnC@lackawanna.edu or Tony Ferrese, Affirmative Action Officer/Seeley Hall Residence Director, Seeley Hall, First Floor, North Washington Avenue, Scranton PA, (570) 504-1760, FerreseT@lackawanna.edu.  

 

Additional information regarding Title IX requirements and how to file a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights: Office of Civil Rights at www2.ed.gov/ocr, 800-421-3481. Philadelphia Office: Office for Civil Rights U.S. Department of Education, The Wanamaker Building,100 Penn Square East, Suite 515, Philadelphia, PA 19107-3323 Telephone: 215-656-8541, Email: OCR.Philadelphia@ed.gov.  

 

 

Portfolio and Coursework

 

Lackawanna College will empower you to experience learning by inspiring your critical thinking, accessing your talents and skills, motivating you toward a career choice, and encouraging you to make a difference. In evidence of this learning, the College requires a graduation portfolio containing Career Documents, including a résumé, two letters of recommendation, and a career exploration; Core Coursework, including a research paper from College Writing; three sample papers or projects from Major Coursework; and a Lackawanna College Reflection Paper.

 

 

Course Schedule

 

Week

Topic

Course Objective Met

Related Assignment, Assessment, or Learning Activity

1.       1/23

To demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.

#1

Getting to know one another

Roots of Psychology.

2.       1/30

To demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.

#1

TV, Film or Book Character Analysis

 

Quiz wk. 5

 

3.       2/6

To demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.

#1

TV, Film or Book Character Analysis-peer review

Quiz wk. 5

 

4.       2/13

To compare and contrast the major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural).

#2

Journal Reflections

Quiz wk. 5

 

 

5.       2/20

To compare and contrast the major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural).

#2

Journal reflections

Quiz week 1-4

 

6.       2/27

To compare and contrast the major perspectives of psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, and sociocultural).

#2

Journal reflections peer review

Quiz wk  10

 

7.       3/6-3/10

SPRING BREAK

SPRING BREAK NO Class this week

 

 

8.       3/13

To develop an enhanced ability to use critical thinking skills to examine issues related to human behavior and mental processes

#3

Heinz Case Study

Everyday life questions and answer session

Quiz wk 10

9.       3/20

To develop an enhanced ability to use critical thinking skills to examine issues related to human behavior and mental processes

#3

Social Experiment

Open discussion

Quiz wk 10

10.   3/27

To develop an enhanced ability to use critical thinking skills to examine issues related to human behavior and mental processes

#3

Heinz Case Study Peer Review

11.   4/3

To articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues.

#4

Social Psychology experiment-Stanford Prison

12.   4/10

To articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues.

#4

Social Psychology –Role Play Stanford Prison

13.   4/17

To articulate how psychological principles can be used to explain social issues.

#4

Stanford prison paper reflection on social psychology

14.   4/24

To examine the sociocultural differences that influence individual differences in behavior

#5

In your everyday life questions

Final Exam

15.   5/1

To examine the sociocultural differences that influence individual differences in behavior

#5

Group think sociocultural differences Review for final exam

16.   5/8

To examine the sociocultural differences that influence individual differences in behavior

#5

Final Exam May 11 10:10-12:10